Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-26-2015

Publication Title

Applied Economics

Volume

47

Issue

55

Pages

6010-6018

Abstract

After the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers in September 2008 and the financial panic that ensued, the Federal Reserve moved rapidly to reduce the federal funds rate to .25%. It was quickly judged that additional measures were needed to stabilize the US economy. Beginning in December 2008, the Federal Reserve Bank initiated three rounds of unconventional monetary policies known as quantitative easing (QE). These policies were intended to reduce long-term interest rates when the short-term federal funds rates had reached the zero lower bound and could not become negative. It was argued that the lowering of longer-term interest rates would help the stock market and thus the wealth of consumers. This article carefully investigates three hypotheses: QE impacting long-term interest rates, QE impacting the stock market and QE impacting unemployment using a Markov regime switching methodology. We conclude that QE has contributed significantly to increases in the stock market but less significantly to long-term interest rate and unemployment.

Comments

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Applied Economics on May 26, 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00036846.2015.1061646

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Included in

Business Commons

Share

COinS