Date of Award

2010

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

School of Education

Abstract

The racial and social attitudes of White physicians-in-training were explored in relation to aspects of self-perceived cross cultural competence. Specifically, internal motivation to respond without prejudice, ethnocultural empathy, color-blind racial attitudes, and general just world beliefs were examined as possible predictors of patient centered attitudes toward patients of color and skillfulness in providing cross cultural care. Multivariate multiple regression analyses found that internal motivation to respond without prejudice was significantly associated with patient centeredness toward patients of color. Global ethnocultural empathy was significantly associated with patient centeredness and skillfulness in providing cross cultural care. General just world beliefs attitudes had no significant relationship to criterion variables in contrast to the proposed hypothesis. Unawareness of blatant racial issues was significantly and positively associated with patient centeredness. Implications, future directions, and limitations of the study are provided.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Share

COinS