Date of Award

2013

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Education

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that plagiarism in U.S. higher education may be more of an issue among Chinese graduate students. When Chinese graduate students are accused of plagiarizing an implicit assumption often exists that poor language skills or lack of integrity may be the cause. The failure to consider cross-cultural issues in learning may have led to these views. An examination of previous learning experiences in the Chinese graduate student's home country was needed in order to obtain a deeper understanding of how culture enters into their understanding of academic dishonesty. This study seeks to a.) explore the understanding and meaning of the concept of academic integrity by graduate students attending U.S. universities from China, b.) explore how U.S. faculty who engage with Chinese graduate students describe these students' understanding of the concept of academic integrity and the factors that contribute to their understanding, and c.) examine ways in which Chinese graduate students and faculty and administrators in the U.S. believe cultural differences impact Chinese student understanding of academic integrity and related issues. Additionally, it examines how U.S. classroom environments as well as institutional policies and practices impact Chinese graduate student understanding of and experience with the concept of academic integrity.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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