Date of Award

2013

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Abstract

As the United States continues to move toward a 24/7 global economy, there is an increasing demand for employees to work outside of the traditional 9-to-5 weekday work schedule. However, scholars have only recently begun to address how these types of work arrangements may shape young children's development. The overarching goal of this study was to examine whether mothers' nonstandard work schedules were associated with preschool-aged children's early reading and mathematics skills and externalizing behavior problems. The current study investigated whether these linkages were especially salient for some groups as opposed to others. Specifically, the moderating roles of mothers' work hours and family structure were tested. Finally, this study explored specific family processes as potential mechanisms linking mothers' nonstandard work to children's well-being, with a focus on mothers' depressive symptoms and positive parenting practices (i.e., cognitive stimulation and emotional supportiveness) as mediators.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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