Date of Award

2016

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Sociology

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to cross-sectionally and longitudinally examine the relationship between adolescent perceptions of their neighborhood and time spent in “risky contexts.” Specifically, the relationship between adolescent perceptions of neighborhood danger and the percent of time spent with older peers or outside was examined. In addition, this study analyzed the relationship between youth perceptions of neighborhood support and the percent time they spent with older peers or outside. All these relationships were also explored in regard to the moderating impact of gender and parental monitoring. An Experience Time Sampling technique (ESM) was utilized to determine how youth spent their time, and questionnaires indicated their perceptions of neighborhood safety, support, and levels of parental monitoring. Overall, results of the analyses demonstrated that more positive perceptions of neighborhood support and perceptions of neighborhood danger were significantly associated with more time spent in risky contexts. The relationships that emerged were additionally found to vary by gender and parental monitoring.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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