Date of Award

2012

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Women's Studies and Gender Studies

Abstract

In the context of historical marginalization of indigenous people from diverse ethnic communities in Bangladesh, this study will investigate how mainstream researches and writings, in books, research reports, newspapers, and blogs on indigenous issues have ignored women's relegation by homogenizing women's distinctive problems with communities' marginalization. The research will explore indigenous women's subordinations in diverse sphere of lives and activism against the power structure that mainstream researches have overlooked. The study will also investigate the possible pathways of solidarity to challenge the systems of power that create control over indigenous people's lives. Thus this research will explore following research questions: How mainstream researches and writings focus on indigenous people's deprivation from male point of views? How and why indigenous women's marginalization are more intense and thereby, different from communities' ostracism? How despite of their active roles in social movement indigenous women's activism becomes unseen? Is intercommunity solidarity enough for dismissing the power structure that discriminate indigenous people, especially women, or transnational solidarity is necessary for broader social changes?

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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