Submission Type

Poster

Degree Type

PhD

Discipline

Social Sciences

Department

Education

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract or Description

Students who receive higher quality math instruction have better outcomes in math (Klibanoff et al. 2006; Kyriakides et al., 2008; Nye et al., 2004; Rockoff, 2004). However, examining math teaching quality, particularly in preschool classrooms, is complicated by the lack of validated measures. To fill this gap, we have validated a video-based observation protocol known as Evaluating Quality Interactions in Preschool-Math (EQUIP-M). EQUIP-M measures quality math instruction and focuses on three interactions: those between the teacher and the mathematics (Teacher Intentionality), those between the teacher and the students around the mathematics (Teacher Responsiveness), and those between the students and the mathematics (Student Mathematical Sense-making).

The sample was comprised of preschool teachers (n=179) participating in a multi-year, professional development program evaluation. Teachers planned activities to engage students in mathematics and videographers recorded those activities in their entirety. Teachers were video-recorded up to three times within a two-week period at up to three timepoints (pre-intervention, post-intervention, one-year follow-up). Each video was scored by at least two certified raters. Raters watched each video in its entirety and then assigned a score for the eight EQUIP-M dimensions.

Preliminary results indicate that raters can be trained to apply scoring rubrics accurately and consistently. To assess inter-rater reliability, we calculated an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.84 using a two-way random effects model with absolute agreement. With further development and evaluation, EQUIP-M has the potential to identify strengths and weaknesses in teaching math and, ultimately, to inform educational professionals about how to improve teacher-child interactions around math.

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Evaluating Quality Interactions in Preschool Math: Validation of a Video-based Observation Protocol

Students who receive higher quality math instruction have better outcomes in math (Klibanoff et al. 2006; Kyriakides et al., 2008; Nye et al., 2004; Rockoff, 2004). However, examining math teaching quality, particularly in preschool classrooms, is complicated by the lack of validated measures. To fill this gap, we have validated a video-based observation protocol known as Evaluating Quality Interactions in Preschool-Math (EQUIP-M). EQUIP-M measures quality math instruction and focuses on three interactions: those between the teacher and the mathematics (Teacher Intentionality), those between the teacher and the students around the mathematics (Teacher Responsiveness), and those between the students and the mathematics (Student Mathematical Sense-making).

The sample was comprised of preschool teachers (n=179) participating in a multi-year, professional development program evaluation. Teachers planned activities to engage students in mathematics and videographers recorded those activities in their entirety. Teachers were video-recorded up to three times within a two-week period at up to three timepoints (pre-intervention, post-intervention, one-year follow-up). Each video was scored by at least two certified raters. Raters watched each video in its entirety and then assigned a score for the eight EQUIP-M dimensions.

Preliminary results indicate that raters can be trained to apply scoring rubrics accurately and consistently. To assess inter-rater reliability, we calculated an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.84 using a two-way random effects model with absolute agreement. With further development and evaluation, EQUIP-M has the potential to identify strengths and weaknesses in teaching math and, ultimately, to inform educational professionals about how to improve teacher-child interactions around math.