Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-30-2019

Publication Title

Nutrition and Cancer

Volume

71

Issue

6

Pages

981-991

Publisher Name

Taylor and Francis

Abstract

Limited data exist regarding body composition and associated patient-reported outcomes for women with metastatic BC. Demographic, clinical, blood, and questionnaire data were collected to quantify body composition and explore associations with symptoms, inflammation, and quality of life (QOL) in 41 women with ER + metastatic BC. Diagnostic/surveillance computed tomography (CT) images including the third lumbar region (L3) were obtained to evaluate skeletal muscle (SM) quantity and quality, and abdominal adipose tissue. Frequencies, medians and interquartile ranges are presented, stratified by sarcopenia and obesity (Body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30.0 kg/m2). Overall, 34% (n = 14/41), 49% (n = 20/41), and 34% (n = 14) of women had sarcopenia, myosteatosis, and obesity, respectively. Handgrip strength was compromised in 24% of subjects (n = 10/41). Women with sarcopenia had significantly lower body weight (P = 0.01), BMI (P ≤ 0.001), and whole body SM (P < 0.001), yet reported greater engagement in leisure time exercises (P = 0.05) vs. nonsarcopenic women. Women with obesity had significantly higher levels of abdominal obesity (all values P < 0.0001) and serum biomarkers of inflammation (P values <0.06), yet lower QOL (P = 0.02) vs. women without obesity. The abPGSGA did not differentiate women with sarcopenia. Future interventions should test if improvements in body composition are associated with better outcomes for this vulnerable, emerging population.

Comments

Author Posting © Taylor and Francis, 2019. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Taylor and Francis for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Nutrition and Cancer, Volume 71, Issue 6, April 2019. doi.org/10.1080/01635581.2019.1595053

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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