Paper Title

Italian Catholicism and its Literary Representations

Location

Richard J. Klarchek Information Commons, 4th Floor, Loyola University Chicago

Start Date

8-11-2013 11:30 AM

End Date

8-11-2013 12:30 PM

Abstract

Presenter: Mary Jo Bona, PhD

Mary Jo Bona is Professor of Italian American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies in the Department of Cultural Analysis and Theory at Stony Brook University. Bona is the author of By the Breath of Their Mouths: Narratives of Resistance in Italian America and Claiming a Tradition: Italian American Women Writers; editor of The Voices We Carry: Recent Italian American Women’s Fiction and co-editor (with Irma Maini) of Multiethnic Literature and Canon Debates. Bona is a past president of the Italian American Studies Association and editor of two of its conference volumes. Bona is the series editor of Multiethnic Literature at SUNY Press. Her current project examines representations of migratory women through the trope of needlework.

Respondent:

Gloria Nardini, PhD
University of Illinois - Chicago

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Nov 8th, 11:30 AM Nov 8th, 12:30 PM

Italian Catholicism and its Literary Representations

Richard J. Klarchek Information Commons, 4th Floor, Loyola University Chicago

Presenter: Mary Jo Bona, PhD

Mary Jo Bona is Professor of Italian American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies in the Department of Cultural Analysis and Theory at Stony Brook University. Bona is the author of By the Breath of Their Mouths: Narratives of Resistance in Italian America and Claiming a Tradition: Italian American Women Writers; editor of The Voices We Carry: Recent Italian American Women’s Fiction and co-editor (with Irma Maini) of Multiethnic Literature and Canon Debates. Bona is a past president of the Italian American Studies Association and editor of two of its conference volumes. Bona is the series editor of Multiethnic Literature at SUNY Press. Her current project examines representations of migratory women through the trope of needlework.

Respondent:

Gloria Nardini, PhD
University of Illinois - Chicago