Date of Award

2017

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Though the labor market is highly competitive and diverse, minority groups only hold 26.7%, of board positions, in companies on the Fortune 500 list (Alliance for Board Diversity Census, 2013). When tasked with hiring managers whom are presented with equivalent job qualifications, evaluators may rely on their subjective impressions in making an employment decision. The evaluator's subjective impressions may be informed by stereotypes of the groups to which applicants belong. The current study tests how stereotypes pertaining to race, gender, and facial structure inform evaluator judgments of managerial applicants' leadership ability and workplace fit. Leadership ability and workplace fit are assessed through ratings of the applicants perceived likeability, competence, and hireability. Participants also suggest the applicants starting salary. Data was collected on MTurk. Participants evaluated 8 pictures that vary in race (Black, White), gender (man, woman), and facial structure (baby face-ness, mature face-ness). I hypothesized that affects of stereotype content on evaluator judgments become more nuanced as multiple group memberships are highlighted.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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