Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-15-2017

Publication Title

Child Development

Volume

89

Issue

3

Pages

245-260

Abstract

Gestures, hand movements that accompany speech, affect children's learning, memory, and thinking (e.g., Goldin‐Meadow, 2003). However, it remains unknown how children distinguish gestures from other kinds of actions. In this study, 4‐ to 9‐year‐olds (n = 339) and adults (n = 50) described one of three scenes: (a) an actor moving objects, (b) an actor moving her hands in the presence of objects (but not touching them), or (c) an actor moving her hands in the absence of objects. Participants across all ages were equally able to identify actions on objects as goal directed, but the ability to identify empty‐handed movements as representational actions (i.e., as gestures) increased with age and was influenced by the presence of objects, especially in older children.

Comments

Author Posting. © The Authors 2017. This article is posted here by permission of the Society for Research in Child Development, Inc. for personal use, not for redistribution. The article was published in Child Development, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12817

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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