Document Type

Book Review

Publication Date

3-2018

Publication Title

Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas

Volume

15

Issue

1

Pages

115-116

Abstract

In this scholarly tour de force, Ruth Milkman brings together four decades of sociological research on women workers to paint a portrait of gendered labor patterns from the Great Depression of the 1930s to the Great Recession of 2007–9. With meticulous research, careful argumentation, and effective writing, Milkman shows how economic actors—especially women workers, unions, and employers—shaped women's employment and key industries of the US economy. As they managed changes in the labor and job markets, these actors both maintained strict job segregation by gender and transformed it, with implications for the dynamism and rigidity of gender roles in society more widely.

Comments

Author Posting. © Duke University Press 2018. This review is posted here by permission of Duke University Press for personal use, not for redistribution. The review was published in Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas, 2018, https://muse.jhu.edu/article/687283

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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