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Submission Type

Oral/Paper Presentation

Degree Type

Masters

Discipline

Sciences

Department

Biology

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract or Description

Anthropogenic litter (i.e., trash; AL) is increasing in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Rivers are both retention sites and conduits for AL. California was the first state to adopt regulations to categorize streams as 'impaired' for AL. Because AL contains a diversity of materials, with variable sources, degradation rates, and mobility, developing methods to measure AL assemblage is a major challenge. Our objective was to compare 3 AL measurement methods 1) qualitative rapid assessment, 2) quantitative visual assessment, and 3) manual collection. Methods 1 and 2 are in development for use in California. Using all 3 methods, we measured AL in 9, 30-m reaches of the North Branch Chicago River and in streams across Illinois that span a gradient of land use and biotic health as measured by the EPA. Results will illustrate how well management indices perform, and will directly improve measurement methods for AL as a newly regulated pollutant, and policies for stream ecosystem management.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Jun 6th, 10:00 AM Jun 6th, 11:00 AM

Talking Trash: Translating California Trash Monitoring Methods to Illinois Streams

Anthropogenic litter (i.e., trash; AL) is increasing in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Rivers are both retention sites and conduits for AL. California was the first state to adopt regulations to categorize streams as 'impaired' for AL. Because AL contains a diversity of materials, with variable sources, degradation rates, and mobility, developing methods to measure AL assemblage is a major challenge. Our objective was to compare 3 AL measurement methods 1) qualitative rapid assessment, 2) quantitative visual assessment, and 3) manual collection. Methods 1 and 2 are in development for use in California. Using all 3 methods, we measured AL in 9, 30-m reaches of the North Branch Chicago River and in streams across Illinois that span a gradient of land use and biotic health as measured by the EPA. Results will illustrate how well management indices perform, and will directly improve measurement methods for AL as a newly regulated pollutant, and policies for stream ecosystem management.