Presenter Information

Prakruti ManiarFollow

Submission Type

Oral/Paper Presentation

Degree Type

Masters

Discipline

Humanities

Department

Digital Humanities

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract or Description

The Digital Humanities knowledge body produced in the last decade rightfully critiques the manner in which technology dictates our social life, questions the power structures of the digital world, raises concerns about the business logics that govern our most-used software.

Digital Humanities in Practice is presented here as an approach to actively addressing some of these problems, by looking at the origin, mission and setup of Purple Pencil Project, an Indian literary venture, that focuses on bringing regional Indian fiction under the same spotlight that Indian English fiction has dominated over last few decades internally, and Anglo-American fiction globally.

It borrows from contemporary understanding of user experience, digital media consumption, social entrepreneurship, content consumption practices, information flow on the web, and the discourses of language and linguistic diversity in India, to attempt to address and resolve key concerns of the literary system in India – a divided readership, a lack of digital or physical access to its books, few and poorly maintained libraries, an imbalanced push for Hindi and English, the idea of Indian literary canon as represented on a global scale – and how digital humanities work can intervene in these questions.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Purple Pencil Project: A Case Study of Digital Humanities in Practice

The Digital Humanities knowledge body produced in the last decade rightfully critiques the manner in which technology dictates our social life, questions the power structures of the digital world, raises concerns about the business logics that govern our most-used software.

Digital Humanities in Practice is presented here as an approach to actively addressing some of these problems, by looking at the origin, mission and setup of Purple Pencil Project, an Indian literary venture, that focuses on bringing regional Indian fiction under the same spotlight that Indian English fiction has dominated over last few decades internally, and Anglo-American fiction globally.

It borrows from contemporary understanding of user experience, digital media consumption, social entrepreneurship, content consumption practices, information flow on the web, and the discourses of language and linguistic diversity in India, to attempt to address and resolve key concerns of the literary system in India – a divided readership, a lack of digital or physical access to its books, few and poorly maintained libraries, an imbalanced push for Hindi and English, the idea of Indian literary canon as represented on a global scale – and how digital humanities work can intervene in these questions.