Submission Type

Oral/Paper Presentation

Degree Type

PhD

Discipline

Social Sciences

Department

Education

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract or Description

While the majority of psychological literature has assumed the professional’s dominant group membership, very little attention has been paid to the perspectives and preparation of clinicians who themselves hail from marginalized or stigmatized backgrounds. We are exploring how this discrimination and inequities manifests early on in the training and impacts the service delivery of minority background professionals. We wish to critique the preparation and support that these professionals receive in providing culturally competent care to their clients from diverse backgrounds. As graduate students in psychological education, and clinicians identifying from culturally diverse backgrounds – we’re are presenting this abstract on the epistemic discrimination experiences that clinicians face early on in training, and how this institutionalized discrimination and prejudice can impact providing qualitative care to clients who may or may not also identify with minority status. We will also be covering empathy fatigue, self-care and burnout, and how therapist’s own coping skills are shaped with experiences of past marginalization/ discrimination. We hope this presentation will be of importance in such an important time to commit to racial and ethnic equity within our academic and professional institutions and we look forward to sharing the seeds of our labor for future implications in the training and preparation of clinicians from minoritized backgrounds.

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Clinicians From Marginalized Backgrounds: Epistemic Discrimination in Training and Practice

While the majority of psychological literature has assumed the professional’s dominant group membership, very little attention has been paid to the perspectives and preparation of clinicians who themselves hail from marginalized or stigmatized backgrounds. We are exploring how this discrimination and inequities manifests early on in the training and impacts the service delivery of minority background professionals. We wish to critique the preparation and support that these professionals receive in providing culturally competent care to their clients from diverse backgrounds. As graduate students in psychological education, and clinicians identifying from culturally diverse backgrounds – we’re are presenting this abstract on the epistemic discrimination experiences that clinicians face early on in training, and how this institutionalized discrimination and prejudice can impact providing qualitative care to clients who may or may not also identify with minority status. We will also be covering empathy fatigue, self-care and burnout, and how therapist’s own coping skills are shaped with experiences of past marginalization/ discrimination. We hope this presentation will be of importance in such an important time to commit to racial and ethnic equity within our academic and professional institutions and we look forward to sharing the seeds of our labor for future implications in the training and preparation of clinicians from minoritized backgrounds.