Presenter Information

Masha BandouilFollow

Major

Fine and Performing Arts

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

The mind/body dichotomy established in Western society has created a form of knowledge acquisition based in the brain. However, rooted in human instinct, the body houses a language in itself that can be effective in communicating knowledge to others in a way that isn't based on level of education or access to specialized knowledge. This research explores the use of movement in communicating scientific knowledge and making it more accessible to the general public. Through a partnership with The Sarnoff Center of Genetics, I created a series of dance films illustrating genetic principles and diseases that disproportionately affect the Jewish community. These films are posted on the organizations website and were presented at the University of Nebraska SciComm conference.

Community Partners

The Sarnoff Center for Jewish Genetics

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Sandra Kaufmann, Director of Dance, Department of Fine and Performing Arts

Streaming Media

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Questioning the Mind/Body Dichotomy in Science Communication

The mind/body dichotomy established in Western society has created a form of knowledge acquisition based in the brain. However, rooted in human instinct, the body houses a language in itself that can be effective in communicating knowledge to others in a way that isn't based on level of education or access to specialized knowledge. This research explores the use of movement in communicating scientific knowledge and making it more accessible to the general public. Through a partnership with The Sarnoff Center of Genetics, I created a series of dance films illustrating genetic principles and diseases that disproportionately affect the Jewish community. These films are posted on the organizations website and were presented at the University of Nebraska SciComm conference.