Presenter Information

Carl LewandowskiFollow

Major

Latin

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Latin deponent verbs, which behave like the active voice yet mostly use the endings associated with the passive, are a persistent curiosity in the study of grammatical voice. This project seeks to problematize the notions of standard active and passive voices, and reassess the relationship between morphology and voice. By comparing common deponents with non-deponent synonyms and near-synonyms, this project attempts to identify what precisely distinguishes deponent verbs. Though it is not conclusive on that question, findings indicate that deponents are not true actives or passives, and that transitive and intransitive deponents should be considered two separate phenomena.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Jacqueline Long

Comments

Please reach out to me at clewandowski1@luc.edu or carl.lewandowski@gmail.com if you have any questions or would like to discuss this topic further!

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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What Makes Deponents Different? Problems in Latin deponency, and a new method for its study

Latin deponent verbs, which behave like the active voice yet mostly use the endings associated with the passive, are a persistent curiosity in the study of grammatical voice. This project seeks to problematize the notions of standard active and passive voices, and reassess the relationship between morphology and voice. By comparing common deponents with non-deponent synonyms and near-synonyms, this project attempts to identify what precisely distinguishes deponent verbs. Though it is not conclusive on that question, findings indicate that deponents are not true actives or passives, and that transitive and intransitive deponents should be considered two separate phenomena.