Presenter Information

Thomas StanilaFollow

Major

Biology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2022

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

The human gut microbiome plays a fundamental role in physiological processes and homeostatic relationships in the body, with research proving its effects beyond gastrointestinal functioning such as in immune response, psychological operation, and nutritional metabolism. Caffeine, nicotine, and theobromine—the principal bioactive compounds in regularly consumed products like coffee, cigarettes, and dark chocolate, respectively—may yield significant and variable influences on human health beyond their normal pharmacodynamics through affecting gut microbiota. Using metagenomic modelling, predictions can be determined regarding intestinal community activity as well. I hypothesize that the compounds will alter microbial community composition in a time- and dose-dependent manner.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Michael Burns, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Biology; Catherine Putonti, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Bioinformatics

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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The role of caffeine, nicotine and theobromine in the biodiversity and function of the human gut microbiome

The human gut microbiome plays a fundamental role in physiological processes and homeostatic relationships in the body, with research proving its effects beyond gastrointestinal functioning such as in immune response, psychological operation, and nutritional metabolism. Caffeine, nicotine, and theobromine—the principal bioactive compounds in regularly consumed products like coffee, cigarettes, and dark chocolate, respectively—may yield significant and variable influences on human health beyond their normal pharmacodynamics through affecting gut microbiota. Using metagenomic modelling, predictions can be determined regarding intestinal community activity as well. I hypothesize that the compounds will alter microbial community composition in a time- and dose-dependent manner.