Presenter Information

Natalia ZielinskiFollow

Major

Neuroscience

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Restricted Access

Abstract

In two studies, we further explore potential differences in how childrens’ and adults’ understanding of a message is influenced by co-speech gesture, focusing on language background and proficiency. We suggest that bilinguals will benefit more from the use of co-speech gesture when processing a message in their lesser developed language, and that this effect will be pronounced among children due to a high difficulty of lexical retrieval. Additionally, we investigate whether the mechanism underlying this potential effect is allocation of visual attention. We find that while language influences what is remembered, language and gesture affect how the information is remembered.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Elizabeth Wakefield, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Streaming Media

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Influences of Age and Language Background on Co-Speech Gesture Processing

In two studies, we further explore potential differences in how childrens’ and adults’ understanding of a message is influenced by co-speech gesture, focusing on language background and proficiency. We suggest that bilinguals will benefit more from the use of co-speech gesture when processing a message in their lesser developed language, and that this effect will be pronounced among children due to a high difficulty of lexical retrieval. Additionally, we investigate whether the mechanism underlying this potential effect is allocation of visual attention. We find that while language influences what is remembered, language and gesture affect how the information is remembered.