Major

Economics

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

The purpose of this research project is to establish a better understanding of the migration rates within major United States cities across the country. Our research and data aim to dive deeper into the economic, political, and social trends occurring in the nation’s most populous cities (New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago and Houston) and utilize comparison analysis techniques to understand urban migration rates in order to determine if the Illinois Exodus is truly unique. In this study, we collect data and analyze tax policies, the housing market, and job opportunities in each city. The utilization of the correlation data analysis and linear regression analysis techniques allow for in-depth investigation of the relationship between each factor and migration trends within the state. Despite the Illinois Exodus analysts statement highlighting housing costs, taxes, and job opportunity as the most significant variables contributing to outmigration, our regression analysis showed high insignificance rates with each variable, excluding the cost of living index score. Limitations in our data included too few variables and inability to analyze the interconnectivity of the variables as an impact on migration rates. Nonetheless, our research provides a basis for re-evaluation of the causes of the Illinois Exodus and a deeper analysis of migration patterns in urban areas throughout the United States.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Anne Reilly, Management Professor

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Diving into the Reality of the Illinois Exodus: What are the Migration Trends in Major United States Cities in 2020 and How Do They Compare to One Another?

The purpose of this research project is to establish a better understanding of the migration rates within major United States cities across the country. Our research and data aim to dive deeper into the economic, political, and social trends occurring in the nation’s most populous cities (New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago and Houston) and utilize comparison analysis techniques to understand urban migration rates in order to determine if the Illinois Exodus is truly unique. In this study, we collect data and analyze tax policies, the housing market, and job opportunities in each city. The utilization of the correlation data analysis and linear regression analysis techniques allow for in-depth investigation of the relationship between each factor and migration trends within the state. Despite the Illinois Exodus analysts statement highlighting housing costs, taxes, and job opportunity as the most significant variables contributing to outmigration, our regression analysis showed high insignificance rates with each variable, excluding the cost of living index score. Limitations in our data included too few variables and inability to analyze the interconnectivity of the variables as an impact on migration rates. Nonetheless, our research provides a basis for re-evaluation of the causes of the Illinois Exodus and a deeper analysis of migration patterns in urban areas throughout the United States.