Presenter Information

Barni NuurFollow

Major

Philosophy

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Current research in philosophy argues that there is an epistemic dimension to injustice and has focused on both testimonial and hermeneutical injustice. Looking at the epistemic dimension of harm that patients experience (specifically Black and non Western immigrants), I argue that, while existing literature in epistemology can speak to the reasoning behind the harm taking place, these epistemological concepts largely ignore cultural and historical contexts that transcend these individual encounters, yet speak to issues that are being ignored when these patients experience harm.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Hanne Jacobs

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Ignored Contextualized Epistemic Injustices in Encounters Between Black Patients and Doctors

Current research in philosophy argues that there is an epistemic dimension to injustice and has focused on both testimonial and hermeneutical injustice. Looking at the epistemic dimension of harm that patients experience (specifically Black and non Western immigrants), I argue that, while existing literature in epistemology can speak to the reasoning behind the harm taking place, these epistemological concepts largely ignore cultural and historical contexts that transcend these individual encounters, yet speak to issues that are being ignored when these patients experience harm.