Presenter Information

Edison HurhFollow

Major

Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Among its many functions, magnesium is of critical importance in maintaining the mineral homeostasis in the lens of the human eye. Cataracts, the leading cause of blindness, is a disease which occurs due to a loss of transparency in the lens. This loss of transparency may have causes rooted in the onset of an imbalance in intracellular ionic concentrations, especially including magnesium. Therefore, developing a reliable and accurate method for the quantification of magnesium in cataracts samples would allow for further insights into the process of cataract formation. The method that has been developed in this project utilized xylidyl blue I as the indicator, as well as E. Coli samples to mimic the biological matrix of cataracts samples in order to optimize the parameters for quantification. This method has so far been found to have a limit of detection of 0.785 ppm.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Martina Schmeling, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry; Michelle Lund, Graduate Student, Chemistry Department

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Detection and Quantification of Magnesium in Biological Samples

Among its many functions, magnesium is of critical importance in maintaining the mineral homeostasis in the lens of the human eye. Cataracts, the leading cause of blindness, is a disease which occurs due to a loss of transparency in the lens. This loss of transparency may have causes rooted in the onset of an imbalance in intracellular ionic concentrations, especially including magnesium. Therefore, developing a reliable and accurate method for the quantification of magnesium in cataracts samples would allow for further insights into the process of cataract formation. The method that has been developed in this project utilized xylidyl blue I as the indicator, as well as E. Coli samples to mimic the biological matrix of cataracts samples in order to optimize the parameters for quantification. This method has so far been found to have a limit of detection of 0.785 ppm.