Presenter Information

Brigid JanosFollow

Major

Forensic Science

Anticipated Graduation Year

2022

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Anolis lizards display craniofacial diversity in the length of the face that has evolved independently of other vertebrate groups. The developmental mechanisms that drive the different facial morphologies for nasal cartilage of anoles has yet to be studied. Through paraffin sectioning and staining the proliferation patterns in A. sagrei embryos will be examined. This project will help determine the patterns of nasal cartilage cell proliferation in relation to craniofacial morphologies. More broadly, these data will help determine macroevolutionary patterns of craniofacial evolution and the convergent evolution of an elongate face.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Thomas Sanger, Ph.D Department of Biology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Determining Patterns of Proliferation in the Nasal Cartilage and Mechanisms of Facial Length Evolution In Lizards

Anolis lizards display craniofacial diversity in the length of the face that has evolved independently of other vertebrate groups. The developmental mechanisms that drive the different facial morphologies for nasal cartilage of anoles has yet to be studied. Through paraffin sectioning and staining the proliferation patterns in A. sagrei embryos will be examined. This project will help determine the patterns of nasal cartilage cell proliferation in relation to craniofacial morphologies. More broadly, these data will help determine macroevolutionary patterns of craniofacial evolution and the convergent evolution of an elongate face.