Presenter Information

Henry WittichFollow
Howard LatenFollow

Major

Bioinformatics

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Long-terminal repeating (LTR) retrotransposons are a class of transposable elements (TE) that replicate via a copy and past mechanism, proliferating to extremely high copy numbers in many plant genomes. Furthermore, LTR-TEs have been implicated in the domestication events of plants such as blood oranges. Trifolium repens (white clover) is an allotetraploid that is theorized to be the result of a hybrid speciation event between T. pallescens and T. occidentale.3 T. repens is also the subject of a current sequencing project, and thus in need of genome-wide sequence annotations. This project is concerned with the annotation of LTR-TEs in the new genome assembly of white clover, in the hopes of elucidating potential insertions that may be related to the species' speciation event.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Howard Laten, Loyola University Chicago Department of Biology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Share

COinS
 

Genome Annotation of LTR Retrotransposons in Trifolium repens

Long-terminal repeating (LTR) retrotransposons are a class of transposable elements (TE) that replicate via a copy and past mechanism, proliferating to extremely high copy numbers in many plant genomes. Furthermore, LTR-TEs have been implicated in the domestication events of plants such as blood oranges. Trifolium repens (white clover) is an allotetraploid that is theorized to be the result of a hybrid speciation event between T. pallescens and T. occidentale.3 T. repens is also the subject of a current sequencing project, and thus in need of genome-wide sequence annotations. This project is concerned with the annotation of LTR-TEs in the new genome assembly of white clover, in the hopes of elucidating potential insertions that may be related to the species' speciation event.