Major

Environmental Science

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Invasive species are deleterious to ecosystems and can cause social and economic damage. Current efforts to deter aquatic invasive species include carbon dioxide (CO2) barriers, which act to prevent their spread within ponds and rivers. Studies show that fish can detect and will avoid water with dissolved CO2; however, it is unknown how this barrier can influence other invasive species. Two invasive mollusk species, the Chinese Mystery snail (Cipangopaludina chinensis) and the Bladder snail (Physella acuta), are a threat to the Great Lakes and nearby bodies of water, as they introduce parasites and reduce populations of sport fish.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Colette Copic, Graduate Student, School of Environmental Sustainability; Reuben Keller, Associate Professor, School of Environmental Sustainability; Rachel Egly, Research Associate, School of Environmental Sustainability.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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The Impacts of a Dissolved Carbon Dioxide Barrier on Behavior of Aquatic Invasive Snails Cipangopaludina chinensis and Physella acuta

Invasive species are deleterious to ecosystems and can cause social and economic damage. Current efforts to deter aquatic invasive species include carbon dioxide (CO2) barriers, which act to prevent their spread within ponds and rivers. Studies show that fish can detect and will avoid water with dissolved CO2; however, it is unknown how this barrier can influence other invasive species. Two invasive mollusk species, the Chinese Mystery snail (Cipangopaludina chinensis) and the Bladder snail (Physella acuta), are a threat to the Great Lakes and nearby bodies of water, as they introduce parasites and reduce populations of sport fish.