Major

Neuroscience

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

This study examined the efficacy of Headspace by comparing self-report levels of positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), and depression before and after eight weeks of Headspace use. Prior research shows that PA and NA are modifiable intervention targets for those with major depressive disorder (MDD). Meditation is also theorized to reduce depression symptoms, enhance PA, and reduce NA in those with MDD. Consistent with prior research, we found a significant reduction in depression symptoms, increase in PA, and decrease in NA. This suggests that Headspace is an effective treatment for depression that can be used to bolster positive emotions.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Ian J. Kahrilas, Graduate Student, Clinical Psychology; Andrew Rauch, Graduate Student, Clinical Psychology; Dr. Rebecca Silton, Associate Professor, Clinical Psychology

Streaming Media

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Share

COinS
 

Be mindful and SMiLe: Changes in PA, NA, and depression after eight weeks of Headspace

This study examined the efficacy of Headspace by comparing self-report levels of positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), and depression before and after eight weeks of Headspace use. Prior research shows that PA and NA are modifiable intervention targets for those with major depressive disorder (MDD). Meditation is also theorized to reduce depression symptoms, enhance PA, and reduce NA in those with MDD. Consistent with prior research, we found a significant reduction in depression symptoms, increase in PA, and decrease in NA. This suggests that Headspace is an effective treatment for depression that can be used to bolster positive emotions.