Presenter Information

Victoria RobertsFollow

Major

Neuroscience

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Restricted Access

Abstract

Teaching through gesture has been found to be very useful for improving learning outcomes in human anatomy and physiology courses (Oh-Chang‐Seok et al., 2011; Skinder-Meredith, 2010); specifically, seeing and doing gesture has been found to be especially useful to learners in the long-term (Cherdieu et al., 2017). In the present study, we investigated the effects of having learners see and do gestures on different targets (a diagram vs. their own bodies) on their ability to learn the anatomy of the human arm. We also looked at how these effects on learning may change over time and if measures of spatiovisual ability and mental imagery predict performance on anatomy assessments.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Elizabeth Wakefield, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Effects of Gesture Targets on Anatomy Learning

Teaching through gesture has been found to be very useful for improving learning outcomes in human anatomy and physiology courses (Oh-Chang‐Seok et al., 2011; Skinder-Meredith, 2010); specifically, seeing and doing gesture has been found to be especially useful to learners in the long-term (Cherdieu et al., 2017). In the present study, we investigated the effects of having learners see and do gestures on different targets (a diagram vs. their own bodies) on their ability to learn the anatomy of the human arm. We also looked at how these effects on learning may change over time and if measures of spatiovisual ability and mental imagery predict performance on anatomy assessments.