Presenter Information

Luke IgnellFollow

Major

Physics

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Dark matter is a popular topic right now in physics. There are several prominent theories with respect to dark matter and its formation. One theory involves the WIMPs, or weakly interacting massive particles. The prediction is that these particles decoupled from equilibrium early in the universe after the “freeze-out” and now remain in high abundance. Another theory is the forbidden dark matter framework which describes dark matter as a thermal relic that annihilates into heavier states. A third theory describes a “freeze-in” mechanism; this scenario involves a feebly interacting massive particle, or FIMP, which never attains thermal equilibrium.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Walter Tangarife, Ph.D., Loyola University Chicago Department of Physics

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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The Early History of Dark Matter

Dark matter is a popular topic right now in physics. There are several prominent theories with respect to dark matter and its formation. One theory involves the WIMPs, or weakly interacting massive particles. The prediction is that these particles decoupled from equilibrium early in the universe after the “freeze-out” and now remain in high abundance. Another theory is the forbidden dark matter framework which describes dark matter as a thermal relic that annihilates into heavier states. A third theory describes a “freeze-in” mechanism; this scenario involves a feebly interacting massive particle, or FIMP, which never attains thermal equilibrium.