Presenter Information

Aleena FerozuddinFollow

Major

Psychology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2020

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

This study was designed to explore how audiovisual exposure influences processing of own- and other-race faces in infancy. Multimodal stimuli have been shown to elicit greater attention and processing in infants compared to unimodal stimuli (Bahrick & Lickliter, 2000; 2002). Infants were recruited to participate in a behavioral study in which they viewed short video clips of South Asian women reciting a children’s story with either audiovisual or visual-only stimulation. Following familiarization to these videos, visual- paired comparisons were used to assess face processing.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Maggie Guy (Professor, Department of Psychology) and Asli Bursalioglu (Graduate Student, Department of Psychology)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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The Impact of Multimodal Other-Race Exposure on the Development of the Other-Race Effect in Infancy

This study was designed to explore how audiovisual exposure influences processing of own- and other-race faces in infancy. Multimodal stimuli have been shown to elicit greater attention and processing in infants compared to unimodal stimuli (Bahrick & Lickliter, 2000; 2002). Infants were recruited to participate in a behavioral study in which they viewed short video clips of South Asian women reciting a children’s story with either audiovisual or visual-only stimulation. Following familiarization to these videos, visual- paired comparisons were used to assess face processing.