Presenter Information

Maily GalindoFollow

Major

Psychology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Individual differences in early language skills have lifelong consequences for children’s academic well-being. Efforts to reduce academic inequities emphasize access to high-quality language experiences. A continued reliance on research using across-group comparisons espouses a deficit perspective on learners from low-income backgrounds, including DLLs. This perspective assumes that children’s underperformance, on language-related measures, is due to low language stimulation within low-income homes. The purpose of this study is to describe the heterogeneity in DLLs’ language experiences and examine the caregiver-child language interactions associated with positive dual language skills.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Perla B. Gámez, Psychology department, Associate Professor; Jordan S. Perry, Developmental psychology graduate student

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Variation in Caregiver Responsivity and its Relation to Latino Dual Language Learners’ Language Skills

Individual differences in early language skills have lifelong consequences for children’s academic well-being. Efforts to reduce academic inequities emphasize access to high-quality language experiences. A continued reliance on research using across-group comparisons espouses a deficit perspective on learners from low-income backgrounds, including DLLs. This perspective assumes that children’s underperformance, on language-related measures, is due to low language stimulation within low-income homes. The purpose of this study is to describe the heterogeneity in DLLs’ language experiences and examine the caregiver-child language interactions associated with positive dual language skills.