Major

Psychology

Access Type

Restricted Access

Abstract

In the current study, we examine whether families’ use of narrative storytelling elements after tinkering will be linked to talk about engineering. Seventeen families met a researcher on Zoom and participated in a home tinkering activity. After tinkering, a researcher interviewed children about their experience. Interviews were coded for use of narrative elements and talk about engineering. We found that families' use of narrative elements was strongly correlated with talk about engineering. Additionally, children with prior digital storytelling experience used more narrative elements in their interviews.

Community Partners

Chicago Children's Museum, Northwestern University

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Catherine A. Haden, Professor, Psychology

Supported By

National Science Foundation Grant No. 1906839/1906940/1906808

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Links Between Storytelling and Engineering Talk during Home Tinkering Activities

In the current study, we examine whether families’ use of narrative storytelling elements after tinkering will be linked to talk about engineering. Seventeen families met a researcher on Zoom and participated in a home tinkering activity. After tinkering, a researcher interviewed children about their experience. Interviews were coded for use of narrative elements and talk about engineering. We found that families' use of narrative elements was strongly correlated with talk about engineering. Additionally, children with prior digital storytelling experience used more narrative elements in their interviews.