Presenter Information

Teresa LeeFollow

Major

Music

Anticipated Graduation Year

2022

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Microplastics, plastic particles <5 mm, are increasingly common in marine and

freshwater ecosystems worldwide and are easily ingested by filter feeding bivalves like oysters, mussels, and clams. Bivalves can have a major impact on ecosystem dynamics, including water clarity and invertebrate abundance, but there are no assessments of microplastics in invasive Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea). We collected water and clams from urban and agricultural streams in Northeastern Illinois and processed them for microplastics based on clam size, location, and microplastic color. Feeding trials and additional samples will be needed to determine mechanistic links between microplastics and Corbicula in future research.

Community Partners

NOAA

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

T. Hoellein, Associate Professor, Biology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Microplastic in Invasive Freshwater Clams (Corbicula fluminea) in Urban and Agricultural Streams

Microplastics, plastic particles <5 >mm, are increasingly common in marine and

freshwater ecosystems worldwide and are easily ingested by filter feeding bivalves like oysters, mussels, and clams. Bivalves can have a major impact on ecosystem dynamics, including water clarity and invertebrate abundance, but there are no assessments of microplastics in invasive Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea). We collected water and clams from urban and agricultural streams in Northeastern Illinois and processed them for microplastics based on clam size, location, and microplastic color. Feeding trials and additional samples will be needed to determine mechanistic links between microplastics and Corbicula in future research.