Presenter Information

Kendall Cathleen RedwoodFollow

Major

Psychology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

I explore non-verbal manifestations of stereotype threat and observe whether racial centrality moderates stereotype threat. Black female-identifying students varying in racial centrality will be assigned to a stereotype threat activation or control condition, then defend themselves in a hypothetical crime. Coders will rate their behaviors and perceived culpability from their statements. Black individuals in the stereotype threat condition will display more non-verbal behaviors and be perceived as more guilty than those in the control. Black individuals higher in racial centrality will rate as more guilty than those with lower centrality. I predict an interaction effect between racial centrality and stereotype threat.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Yael Granot, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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The Effects of Racial Centrality on Stereotype Threat

I explore non-verbal manifestations of stereotype threat and observe whether racial centrality moderates stereotype threat. Black female-identifying students varying in racial centrality will be assigned to a stereotype threat activation or control condition, then defend themselves in a hypothetical crime. Coders will rate their behaviors and perceived culpability from their statements. Black individuals in the stereotype threat condition will display more non-verbal behaviors and be perceived as more guilty than those in the control. Black individuals higher in racial centrality will rate as more guilty than those with lower centrality. I predict an interaction effect between racial centrality and stereotype threat.