Presenter Information

Lauren CollinsFollow

Major

Political Science

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

As the effects of food deserts continue throughout Chicago, the opportunities for residents in particular neighborhoods to buy quality, affordable, diverse, and fresh food in close proximity to them dwindles. This paper contends that the distinct racial and socio-economic divides in Chicago neighborhoods create low food access and disproportionate food qualities between neighborhoods. Additionally, this trend is linked to health concerns, such as obesity and diabetes. Despite these clear correlations, Chicago’s government policies have failed to create effective change when it comes to these problems. Therefore, a multidimensional approach that promotes community involvement is needed to remedy food deserts and inequities in Chicago.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Brian Endless, Advanced Lecturer, Director of African Studies and African Diaspora Program, Political Science Department

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Chicago, It’s Time to Desert Food Deserts: Health Concerns and Policy Suggestions

As the effects of food deserts continue throughout Chicago, the opportunities for residents in particular neighborhoods to buy quality, affordable, diverse, and fresh food in close proximity to them dwindles. This paper contends that the distinct racial and socio-economic divides in Chicago neighborhoods create low food access and disproportionate food qualities between neighborhoods. Additionally, this trend is linked to health concerns, such as obesity and diabetes. Despite these clear correlations, Chicago’s government policies have failed to create effective change when it comes to these problems. Therefore, a multidimensional approach that promotes community involvement is needed to remedy food deserts and inequities in Chicago.