Major

Psychology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2022

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

For the present ongoing project, we are examining the relationship between self-compassion and compassion for others and how the use of Headspace, a mindfulness meditation mobile application, affects compassion and, consequently, mental health. Participants for the current study consist of undergraduate college students with elevated depression symptoms. Participants are randomized into a mindfulness intervention group or a waitlist control group, take part in an 8-week trial of self-guided Headspace use, and complete surveys at four time points: pre-intervention, 4 weeks, 8 weeks (post-intervention), and 1-month follow-up. As a part of these surveys, participants complete measures of compassion for others, self-compassion, and depression. We predict a positive correlation between self-compassion and compassion for others. We also expect that Headspace use will increase overall compassion, which, in turn, will decrease depression (i.e., self-compassion and compassion for others will act as mediators for the intervention’s effect). The findings of the study may provide evidence for an everyday tool to improve compassion and psychological well-being.

Community Partners

Headspace

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Colleen Conley, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Clinical Psychology; Carol Hundert, M.A., Clinical Psychology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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The Impact of a Mindfulness Mobile Application on Compassion and Psychological Well-being

For the present ongoing project, we are examining the relationship between self-compassion and compassion for others and how the use of Headspace, a mindfulness meditation mobile application, affects compassion and, consequently, mental health. Participants for the current study consist of undergraduate college students with elevated depression symptoms. Participants are randomized into a mindfulness intervention group or a waitlist control group, take part in an 8-week trial of self-guided Headspace use, and complete surveys at four time points: pre-intervention, 4 weeks, 8 weeks (post-intervention), and 1-month follow-up. As a part of these surveys, participants complete measures of compassion for others, self-compassion, and depression. We predict a positive correlation between self-compassion and compassion for others. We also expect that Headspace use will increase overall compassion, which, in turn, will decrease depression (i.e., self-compassion and compassion for others will act as mediators for the intervention’s effect). The findings of the study may provide evidence for an everyday tool to improve compassion and psychological well-being.