Presenter Information

Kannon LarisonFollow

Major

Environmental Science

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

A contributing vector for the influx of invasive species into the Great Lakes has been via the system of channels and canals that make up the Chicago Area Waterway Systems (CAWS). This system provides a continuous artificial aquatic connection between the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Basins. Currently, the continued expansion of invasive carp species (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis & molitrix) has been slowed by a system of electric barriers operated by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. There is limited work on the effectiveness of this barrier against other invasives. In this study, observations were recorded for invasive/potential invasive invertebrates to gain insight into the efficacy of this control method for invasive crayfish species.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Reuben Keller, Associate Professor, School of Environmental Sustainability

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Evaluating the efficacy of electric fields on invasive crayfish based on observed behavioral changes

A contributing vector for the influx of invasive species into the Great Lakes has been via the system of channels and canals that make up the Chicago Area Waterway Systems (CAWS). This system provides a continuous artificial aquatic connection between the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Basins. Currently, the continued expansion of invasive carp species (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis & molitrix) has been slowed by a system of electric barriers operated by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. There is limited work on the effectiveness of this barrier against other invasives. In this study, observations were recorded for invasive/potential invasive invertebrates to gain insight into the efficacy of this control method for invasive crayfish species.