Presentation Title

Structural Processes that Lead to Voter Disenfranchisement

Presenter Information

Pooja RaiFollow

Major

Criminal Justice

Anticipated Graduation Year

senior

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

This research examined how different populations are disenfranchised by systemic voting policies. Populations such as immigrants, people of color, incarcerated and unhoused individuals are often left out of the conversation when it comes to having a say in their communities as a result of not fitting a specific criteria to vote. Additionally, oftentimes many people in these marginalized communities and outside are eligible to vote but are either not registered or simply to not vote. This research heavily utilizes Census data from 2020 to analyze which demographic is voting and then further cross referencing it with topics such as guardianship, ID and mailing laws to conclude how barriers are set up in different communities. This research is meant to expand on the topic voting barriers as there is a multitude already focused on post conviction and currently incarcerated individuals by exploring other vulnerable populations. The research concludes by drawing results on intersectional identities and the use of systemic policies, and how different legislation and organizations are beginning to address changing these in order to make the ballot more equitable and accessible.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Aram SiFuentes

Supported By

CURL

Comments

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1vbgMHy58QbZy-Qlv2kjnGlhHluX1W01s9LKVgRem9zM/edit?usp=sharing

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Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Structural Processes that Lead to Voter Disenfranchisement

This research examined how different populations are disenfranchised by systemic voting policies. Populations such as immigrants, people of color, incarcerated and unhoused individuals are often left out of the conversation when it comes to having a say in their communities as a result of not fitting a specific criteria to vote. Additionally, oftentimes many people in these marginalized communities and outside are eligible to vote but are either not registered or simply to not vote. This research heavily utilizes Census data from 2020 to analyze which demographic is voting and then further cross referencing it with topics such as guardianship, ID and mailing laws to conclude how barriers are set up in different communities. This research is meant to expand on the topic voting barriers as there is a multitude already focused on post conviction and currently incarcerated individuals by exploring other vulnerable populations. The research concludes by drawing results on intersectional identities and the use of systemic policies, and how different legislation and organizations are beginning to address changing these in order to make the ballot more equitable and accessible.