Presentation Title

Faking Identities and Committing Fraud Crimes in Cyberspace

Presenter Information

Christine GrafFollow

Major

Criminal Justice

Anticipated Graduation Year

2022

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

The FBI’s 2020 Internet Crime Report showed an increase of more than 300,000 complaints from 2019 – with losses from internet fraud surpassing $4.2 billion (FBI, 2021). The purpose of this research study is to investigate the personal and emotional factors that influence cybercrime perpetration. Of the current research available on cybercrimes, most seek to explain why people commit cybercrimes, but do not explore the factors focused on in this study. We examine the influence of interpersonal sources, media sources, prior victimization, and personality traits such as narcissism, psychopathy, and low self-control on internet fraud perpetration.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Loretta Stalans, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology; Psychology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Faking Identities and Committing Fraud Crimes in Cyberspace

The FBI’s 2020 Internet Crime Report showed an increase of more than 300,000 complaints from 2019 – with losses from internet fraud surpassing $4.2 billion (FBI, 2021). The purpose of this research study is to investigate the personal and emotional factors that influence cybercrime perpetration. Of the current research available on cybercrimes, most seek to explain why people commit cybercrimes, but do not explore the factors focused on in this study. We examine the influence of interpersonal sources, media sources, prior victimization, and personality traits such as narcissism, psychopathy, and low self-control on internet fraud perpetration.