Presentation Title

Electronic Waste: The toxic currency of Agbogbloshie, Ghana

Presenter Information

Christopher SimpkinsFollow

Major

Environmental Science

Anticipated Graduation Year

Electronic Waste: The toxic currency of Agbogbloshie, Ghana

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

In order to strengthen public health students' ability to present information in a professional manner, Professor Justin Harbison created the assignment of a 5-10 minute informational video surronding an environmental health subject for the course PUBH: 301 - Environmental Health. This video describes the environmental and human health concerns associated with the electronic waste (e-waste) burning activities conducted in Agbogbloshie, Ghana. To better understand the problem and its connection to consumerism, I illustrate the sociopolitical, economic, and historical forces that perpetuate inequitable, post-colonial waste management systems.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Justin Harbison, Assistant Professor - Public Health Sciences

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Share

COinS
 

Electronic Waste: The toxic currency of Agbogbloshie, Ghana

In order to strengthen public health students' ability to present information in a professional manner, Professor Justin Harbison created the assignment of a 5-10 minute informational video surronding an environmental health subject for the course PUBH: 301 - Environmental Health. This video describes the environmental and human health concerns associated with the electronic waste (e-waste) burning activities conducted in Agbogbloshie, Ghana. To better understand the problem and its connection to consumerism, I illustrate the sociopolitical, economic, and historical forces that perpetuate inequitable, post-colonial waste management systems.