Presenter Information

Ariel StepankovskayaFollow

Major

Neuroscience

Anticipated Graduation Year

2022

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Though it is widely known that sleep follows a 24-hour cycle, otherwise known as a circadian rhythm, there exists a myriad of other behaviors that follow a circadian rhythm as well, such as feeding. Modifying the time of feeding alone can lead to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Thus, not only is it important what you eat, but also when you eat. As a Neuroscience student at Loyola, I work with Dr. Daniel Cavanaugh in his lab to uncover a pathway in the circadian regulation of feeding by looking at Drosophila melanogaster, otherwise known as the fruit fly, which holds many similarities to the human genome. Our lab hypothesizes that PI cells release the neuropeptide SIFamide to downstream areas in the brain to create feeding rhythms. By identifying the downstream areas using green and magenta fluorescent markers and monitoring feeding rhythms using FLIC monitors, we aim to identify the brain areas SIFa works with to create robust feeding rhythms.

The striking green and magenta watercolors throughout the piece represent the fluorescent markers used to detect our target areas. Starting at the bottom right corner, I drew a clock to represent the circadian regulation of feeding, with the minute-hand representing a PI cell releasing SIFamide neuropeptides. These neuropeptides draw the eye to our model organism, the Drosophila. Though the largest and most focal point of the piece, the fly is still drawn behind the clock, emphasizing its subjugation to circadian regulation. In response to SIFa release, the fly inches towards the FLIC monitors at the top left corner of the piece to consume liquid food. Coming from these feeding monitors are faint electrical signals that result from the fly making physical contact with the food, representing a fly’s feeding rhythm.

Though as small as the eye of a needle, exploring these mechanisms in the fruit fly allows our lab to move closer to a better understanding of feeding rhythms in humans and how we can adjust our feeding schedules to improve our health.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28585194/

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SIFamide in the Circadian Regulation of Feeding

Though it is widely known that sleep follows a 24-hour cycle, otherwise known as a circadian rhythm, there exists a myriad of other behaviors that follow a circadian rhythm as well, such as feeding. Modifying the time of feeding alone can lead to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Thus, not only is it important what you eat, but also when you eat. As a Neuroscience student at Loyola, I work with Dr. Daniel Cavanaugh in his lab to uncover a pathway in the circadian regulation of feeding by looking at Drosophila melanogaster, otherwise known as the fruit fly, which holds many similarities to the human genome. Our lab hypothesizes that PI cells release the neuropeptide SIFamide to downstream areas in the brain to create feeding rhythms. By identifying the downstream areas using green and magenta fluorescent markers and monitoring feeding rhythms using FLIC monitors, we aim to identify the brain areas SIFa works with to create robust feeding rhythms.

The striking green and magenta watercolors throughout the piece represent the fluorescent markers used to detect our target areas. Starting at the bottom right corner, I drew a clock to represent the circadian regulation of feeding, with the minute-hand representing a PI cell releasing SIFamide neuropeptides. These neuropeptides draw the eye to our model organism, the Drosophila. Though the largest and most focal point of the piece, the fly is still drawn behind the clock, emphasizing its subjugation to circadian regulation. In response to SIFa release, the fly inches towards the FLIC monitors at the top left corner of the piece to consume liquid food. Coming from these feeding monitors are faint electrical signals that result from the fly making physical contact with the food, representing a fly’s feeding rhythm.

Though as small as the eye of a needle, exploring these mechanisms in the fruit fly allows our lab to move closer to a better understanding of feeding rhythms in humans and how we can adjust our feeding schedules to improve our health.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28585194/