Presentation Title

Heterochromia

Presenter Information

Liliya-Mariya PirevaFollow

Major

Neuroscience

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

The color of the iris, the part of the eye that controls the amount of light that can reach the retina, is determined by the concentration and distribution of melanin. Specifically, the ratio of concentrations of eumelanin and pheomelanin (along with variations of their distributions) in the stroma of the iris are what create the unique combinations of eye colors.

Heterochromia is an especially distinctive condition in which the iris or irises are differently colored. It is typically due to genetic mutation, although it can also develop because of an injury or congenital syndrome. It comes in three different forms: complete heterochromia, as often seen in pets such as Siberian huskies, where one iris is a completely different color than the other; central heterochromia, where the inner part of the iris closest to the pupil is differently colored than the outer part, and segmental heterochromia, as featured in this piece, in which a section of one iris is differently colored.

The use of colored pencils in this piece allowed for very precise lines, which reflect the incredible detail, complexity, and beauty of the iris and the condition. White gel pens were added on top of the colored pencil to incorporate an extra layer of depth and help bring the art to life. Lastly, tan paper was used for this piece rather than white, as light colors like beige, cream, or light blue appear more vibrant and blend more seamlessly when used on a darker paper. Blending and vibrancy are important aspects of this piece as they help communicate the intense beauty of heterochromia.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Heterochromia

The color of the iris, the part of the eye that controls the amount of light that can reach the retina, is determined by the concentration and distribution of melanin. Specifically, the ratio of concentrations of eumelanin and pheomelanin (along with variations of their distributions) in the stroma of the iris are what create the unique combinations of eye colors.

Heterochromia is an especially distinctive condition in which the iris or irises are differently colored. It is typically due to genetic mutation, although it can also develop because of an injury or congenital syndrome. It comes in three different forms: complete heterochromia, as often seen in pets such as Siberian huskies, where one iris is a completely different color than the other; central heterochromia, where the inner part of the iris closest to the pupil is differently colored than the outer part, and segmental heterochromia, as featured in this piece, in which a section of one iris is differently colored.

The use of colored pencils in this piece allowed for very precise lines, which reflect the incredible detail, complexity, and beauty of the iris and the condition. White gel pens were added on top of the colored pencil to incorporate an extra layer of depth and help bring the art to life. Lastly, tan paper was used for this piece rather than white, as light colors like beige, cream, or light blue appear more vibrant and blend more seamlessly when used on a darker paper. Blending and vibrancy are important aspects of this piece as they help communicate the intense beauty of heterochromia.