Presenter Information

Aaliyah SevierFollow

Major

Biology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2020

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

People with addictions are seen as having diminished autonomy and contemporary accounts often define their lack of autonomy in reference to an idealized conception of autonomy. In this project, I introduce a new perspective that promotes fullness of autonomy in addicts and provides context for valid instances of diminished autonomy. My argument follows from a perspective developed by Agnieszka Jaworska, in which she highlights how Alzheimer's patients are still capable of having autonomy. I will highlight how focusing on autonomy and addiction provides better insight into autonomy for everyone else rather than centering idealized standards of contemporary accounts of autonomy.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Joseph Vukov, Assistant Professor, Philosophy

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Autonomy and Addiction and What It Means for the Rest of Us

People with addictions are seen as having diminished autonomy and contemporary accounts often define their lack of autonomy in reference to an idealized conception of autonomy. In this project, I introduce a new perspective that promotes fullness of autonomy in addicts and provides context for valid instances of diminished autonomy. My argument follows from a perspective developed by Agnieszka Jaworska, in which she highlights how Alzheimer's patients are still capable of having autonomy. I will highlight how focusing on autonomy and addiction provides better insight into autonomy for everyone else rather than centering idealized standards of contemporary accounts of autonomy.