Presenter Information

Julianna ScivinskyFollow

Major

Environmental Science

Anticipated Graduation Year

2022

Access Type

Restricted Access

Abstract

Invasive populations of Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and Scud (Apocorophium lacustre) cause large ecological and economic damages. Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been proposed to control the spread of invasive fishes. However, little is known about how aquatic invertebrates respond to water with high concentrations of CO2. We conducted experiments to observe the behavioral and physiological responses of A. lacustre and juvenile P. clarkii to elevated CO2. This research suggests that elevated CO2 can be used to affect the behavior of scud and juvenile crayfish, but it may not be an effective barrier to their spread.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Reuben Keller, Professor, Institute of Environmental Sustainability; Rachel Egly, Lab Technician, Institute of Environmental Sustainability; Colette Copic, Graduate Student, Institute of Environmental Sustainability

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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CARBON DIOXIDE BARRIERS AS A METHOD OF CONTROL OF JUVENILE RED SWAMP CRAYFISH AND SCUD

Invasive populations of Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and Scud (Apocorophium lacustre) cause large ecological and economic damages. Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been proposed to control the spread of invasive fishes. However, little is known about how aquatic invertebrates respond to water with high concentrations of CO2. We conducted experiments to observe the behavioral and physiological responses of A. lacustre and juvenile P. clarkii to elevated CO2. This research suggests that elevated CO2 can be used to affect the behavior of scud and juvenile crayfish, but it may not be an effective barrier to their spread.