Presenter Information

Brendan TwaddellFollow

Major

Environmental Science

Anticipated Graduation Year

2020

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

This study investigated the potential for using spent coffee ground waste as a substrate material for Pleurotus pulmonarius, Phoenix Oyster mushroom cultivation. As a college campus, Loyola University Chicago produces vast amounts of coffee waste that, even when composted, contributes to carbon emissions. By diverting this waste product to hyper-local food production, we can hope to help further close the loop of Loyola’s food system. The results of the study suggest that coffee grounds on their own may not be a good candidate for a substrate, but as a supplement for more carbon-rich substrates they do have some promise.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Kevin Erickson, Urban Agriculture Coordinator

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Share

COinS
 

Trash to Table: Pleurotus pulmonarius Cultivation on Spent Coffee Grounds

This study investigated the potential for using spent coffee ground waste as a substrate material for Pleurotus pulmonarius, Phoenix Oyster mushroom cultivation. As a college campus, Loyola University Chicago produces vast amounts of coffee waste that, even when composted, contributes to carbon emissions. By diverting this waste product to hyper-local food production, we can hope to help further close the loop of Loyola’s food system. The results of the study suggest that coffee grounds on their own may not be a good candidate for a substrate, but as a supplement for more carbon-rich substrates they do have some promise.