Major

Psychology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2019

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between violent crime, future expectations and beliefs about aggression, moderated by perceptions of neighborhood cohesion and gender on Black and Latinx adolescents residing in high risk communities. Federal crime data based on zip codes were used. It was hypothesized that youth exposed to higher rates of violent crime would experience lower future expectations and higher beliefs about aggression and that youth with positive perceptions of neighborhood cohesion would experience a less salient relationship between violent crime, aggressive beliefs, and future expectations. The results did not support the hypotheses, as there were no main effects.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Maryse Richards, PhD, Psychology, Cynthia Onyeka, M.A., Psychology, Dr. Maria Wathen, PhD, Social Work

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Share

COinS
 

Violent Crime and Youth Resilience

This study investigated the relationship between violent crime, future expectations and beliefs about aggression, moderated by perceptions of neighborhood cohesion and gender on Black and Latinx adolescents residing in high risk communities. Federal crime data based on zip codes were used. It was hypothesized that youth exposed to higher rates of violent crime would experience lower future expectations and higher beliefs about aggression and that youth with positive perceptions of neighborhood cohesion would experience a less salient relationship between violent crime, aggressive beliefs, and future expectations. The results did not support the hypotheses, as there were no main effects.