Presenter Information

Diana MahlisFollow

Major

Neuroscience

Anticipated Graduation Year

2020

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

This study addresses the issue of lack of racial and ethnic diversity in infant developmental psychology and neuroscience research with the intention of highlighting the importance of a diverse sample to better understanding the typical developmental trajectory of social processing. Infants were recruited to participate in an event-related potential (ERP) study, in which neural responses were measured to upright and inverted faces and houses. ERP components associated with face processing and infant attention, including the N290 and P400, were measured to investigate developmental trends from 6 to 24 months of age.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Maggie Guy, PhD, Department of Psychology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Recruitment of a Diverse Infant Sample in the Investigation of the Development of Social Processing

This study addresses the issue of lack of racial and ethnic diversity in infant developmental psychology and neuroscience research with the intention of highlighting the importance of a diverse sample to better understanding the typical developmental trajectory of social processing. Infants were recruited to participate in an event-related potential (ERP) study, in which neural responses were measured to upright and inverted faces and houses. ERP components associated with face processing and infant attention, including the N290 and P400, were measured to investigate developmental trends from 6 to 24 months of age.