Presenter Information

Masha BandouilFollow

Major

Fine and Performing Arts

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

The mind/body dichotomy established in Western society has created a form of knowledge acquisition rooted in the brain. Humans house knowledge physically as well as mentally and by excluding the physical body, an injustice is created towards individuals of different learning styles, education levels, and languages. This research explores the use of movement in communicating scientific knowledge by partnering with The Sarnoff Center of Genetics, in order to create a series of dance films illustrating genetic principles and diseases that disproportionately affect the Jewish community. These films will be posted on the organizations website and will be followed by surveys that gather qualitative data on the degree to which the films were effective.

Community Partners

Norton & Elaine Sarnoff Center for Jewish Genetics

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Sandra Kaufmann, Director of Dance, Department of Fine and Performing Arts

Supported By

Sarah Goldberg, Assistant Director at the Norton & Elaine Sarnoff Center for Jewish Genetics

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Questioning the Mind/Body Dichotomy in Scientific Communication

The mind/body dichotomy established in Western society has created a form of knowledge acquisition rooted in the brain. Humans house knowledge physically as well as mentally and by excluding the physical body, an injustice is created towards individuals of different learning styles, education levels, and languages. This research explores the use of movement in communicating scientific knowledge by partnering with The Sarnoff Center of Genetics, in order to create a series of dance films illustrating genetic principles and diseases that disproportionately affect the Jewish community. These films will be posted on the organizations website and will be followed by surveys that gather qualitative data on the degree to which the films were effective.