Presentation Title

Identifying the Archaeological Signatures of Inequality: An Analysis of Inequality at Late Formative La Joya and Bezuapan

Presenter Information

Nicholas PuenteFollow

Major

Anthropology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2019

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

This research project presents an analysis of data from two Late Formative Period (ca. 400 BC-AD 100) sites in southern Veracruz, Mexico. The study focuses on how wealth inequality is manifested in the archaeological record; An analysis of systematic coring data, and information derived from in-field excavations, provides insight into wealth inequality across households.

These data are interpreted using an economic measure known as the Gini index. This measure has been increasingly applied to archaeological sites, and this thesis seeks to provide another useful and comparable archaeological example of the index’s utility and a discussion of the index’s limitations.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Philip J. Arnold III, Professor of Anthropology

Supported By

Dr. Christopher Pool, University of Kentucky; Dr. Robert Drennan, University of Pittsburgh

Comments

Complete text of thesis.

https://1drv.ms/w/s!Ai5Lfm0B6yazi0yEX8QnSE74cHNq?e=QIhqqR

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Identifying the Archaeological Signatures of Inequality: An Analysis of Inequality at Late Formative La Joya and Bezuapan

This research project presents an analysis of data from two Late Formative Period (ca. 400 BC-AD 100) sites in southern Veracruz, Mexico. The study focuses on how wealth inequality is manifested in the archaeological record; An analysis of systematic coring data, and information derived from in-field excavations, provides insight into wealth inequality across households.

These data are interpreted using an economic measure known as the Gini index. This measure has been increasingly applied to archaeological sites, and this thesis seeks to provide another useful and comparable archaeological example of the index’s utility and a discussion of the index’s limitations.