Presenter Information

Victoria RoggyFollow

Loading...

Media is loading
 

Major

Business Administration

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Chicago’s Air Quality is ranked one of the worst in the nation and seems to recently be worsening, therefore looking at how air quality and other factors may impact asthma hospitalizations is important to help policy makers or groups find ways to mitigate the negative health effects. The purpose of this study is to investigate the connection between urban population demographics of Chicago neighborhoods with their coinciding asthma hospitalization rates. Using a cluster analysis, this study analyzed demographics of the 77 Chicago neighborhoods in 2010 along with their rates of hospitalization, air quality scores, and pollution burden scores, in order to create 5 distinct clusters that were each unique in their own way. The land usage in the neighborhoods was found to play little to no role in predicting a higher rate of hospitalizations; while for the most part, air quality score, percentage of black population, and income level had somewhat of a significance in regard to higher rates of hospitalizations. Clusters 1 and 2 were the most direct in their relationship of poor air quality with larger rates of hospitalizations. Comparatively, Cluster 4 was surprisingly almost the opposite in which poor air quality was linked to low hospitalizations. This study does not show any definitive link between land usage or pollution burden and higher rates of asthma hospitalizations but shows a slight link between other factors such as race or income percentages as well as the air quality and health index percentile. Further studies are needed to establish a greater understanding for the neighborhoods in Cluster 4, as well as updated data sources with more reliable data collection to validate the research.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Professor Carolyn Kmet

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Share

COinS
 

Chicago Neighborhoods Demographic Data and Asthma Hospitalizations Clustered

Chicago’s Air Quality is ranked one of the worst in the nation and seems to recently be worsening, therefore looking at how air quality and other factors may impact asthma hospitalizations is important to help policy makers or groups find ways to mitigate the negative health effects. The purpose of this study is to investigate the connection between urban population demographics of Chicago neighborhoods with their coinciding asthma hospitalization rates. Using a cluster analysis, this study analyzed demographics of the 77 Chicago neighborhoods in 2010 along with their rates of hospitalization, air quality scores, and pollution burden scores, in order to create 5 distinct clusters that were each unique in their own way. The land usage in the neighborhoods was found to play little to no role in predicting a higher rate of hospitalizations; while for the most part, air quality score, percentage of black population, and income level had somewhat of a significance in regard to higher rates of hospitalizations. Clusters 1 and 2 were the most direct in their relationship of poor air quality with larger rates of hospitalizations. Comparatively, Cluster 4 was surprisingly almost the opposite in which poor air quality was linked to low hospitalizations. This study does not show any definitive link between land usage or pollution burden and higher rates of asthma hospitalizations but shows a slight link between other factors such as race or income percentages as well as the air quality and health index percentile. Further studies are needed to establish a greater understanding for the neighborhoods in Cluster 4, as well as updated data sources with more reliable data collection to validate the research.