Presenter Information

Rohan MedaFollow

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Major

Neuroscience

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) allow direct neurological control of assistive technologies such as prosthetics and wheelchairs. Because there are no complete remedies for full functional regeneration of damaged neurons, there is a rising prevalence of such technologies. Among others, they raise questions about how BCI-mediated actions may intersect with our current ways of understanding moral responsibility (Rainey et al 2020). In this presentation, I approach current discussions about BCI-mediated action and responsibility through the lens of a different concept: blame. By providing a theoretical framework focused on blame, the hope is to move forward conversations about moral responsibility in BCI-mediated action.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Joseph Vukov, Assistant Professor, Philosophy; Jeremy Winget, PhD Candidate, Psychology

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Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Brain-Computer Interfaces and Action: Who is to Blame?

Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) allow direct neurological control of assistive technologies such as prosthetics and wheelchairs. Because there are no complete remedies for full functional regeneration of damaged neurons, there is a rising prevalence of such technologies. Among others, they raise questions about how BCI-mediated actions may intersect with our current ways of understanding moral responsibility (Rainey et al 2020). In this presentation, I approach current discussions about BCI-mediated action and responsibility through the lens of a different concept: blame. By providing a theoretical framework focused on blame, the hope is to move forward conversations about moral responsibility in BCI-mediated action.